Aircraft Collection

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OH-6A Cayuse

first flying in 1963

Formerly the Hughes model 369, the OH-6A Cayuse (nicknamed "Loach") was designed for use as a military scout during the Vietnam conflict to meet the U.S. Army's need for an extremely maneuverable light observation helicopter.


Specifications
WINGSPAN: Rotor Diameter: 26 ft. 4''
LENGTH: 23 feet
MAXIMUM WEIGHT: 8,404 lb Payload: 2,700 lb
PERFORMANCE: Allison T-63-A-5A turbo shaft
TOP SPEED: 147 mph maximum
RANGE: 413 miles
CEILING: ---
RATE OF CLIMB: ---
ARMAMENT: Can be armed with the M26 armament subsystem mounting a M134 7.62 mini-gun or 40 mm grenade launcher on the XM8 armament subsystem. An M60D 7.62 mm machine gun could be mounted in the right door opening.
History

Formerly the Hughes model 369, the OH-6A Cayuse (nicknamed "Loach") was designed for use as a military scout during the Vietnam conflict to meet the U.S. Army's need for an extremely maneuverable light observation helicopter. Initially fielded in Vietnam in early 1968, the Cayuse was employed in command and control; observation and reconnaissance; and target acquisition. The four-passenger teardrop shaped was a small, light, sturdy, highly, maneuverable helicopter, with very low drag.

The Cayuse was teamed often with the AH-1G "Cobra" attack helicopter in acquiring and attacking enemy targets. The Cayuse would "troll for fire" across suspected enemy positions; place smoke on the target; and allow the Cobra to attack the positions. The Cayuse could absorb an extensive amount of enemy small arms fire; yet still bring the crew home.

 

AH-1S COBRA

introduced in 1967

The Bell AH-1 Cobra is a two-blade, single-engine attack helicopter manufactured by Bell Helicopter, developed using the engine, transmission and rotor system of the Bell UH-1 Iroquois.

Specifications
WINGSPAN:
LENGTH: 53 feet
MAXIMUM WEIGHT: 8,404 lb (Payload: 2,500 lb)
PERFORMANCE: Lycoming T53-L-11 1100 hp engine
TOP SPEED: 138 mph
RANGE: 359 miles
CEILING:
RATE OF CLIMB:
ARMAMENT: Varies depending on model. For AH-1G "Snake": 2.75-inch (70mm) Folding Fin Aerial Rockets in M158 7-tube or M200 19- tube rocket launcher; chin-turret mounted M134 7.62 mm "mini-gun" and the m129 40mm grenade launcher. AH1-G could be mounted with the M134 "mini-gun" in fixed-mounted M18/M18A1 gun pod and left-side mounted M195 20 mm automatic gun on M35 armament subsystem. The AH-1G could also mount the XM118 smoke grenade launcher.
History

AH-1 Cobras were in use by the Army during the Tet offensive in 1968 and through to the end of the Vietnam War. Cobras provided fire support for ground forces, escorted transport helicopters and other roles, including aerial rocket artillery (ARA) battalions in the two Airmobile divisions. They also formed "hunter killer" teams by pairing with OH-6A scout helicopters. A team featured one OH-6 flying slow and low to find enemy forces. If the OH-6 drew fire, the Cobra could strike at the then revealed enemy. On 12 September 1968, Capt. Ronald Fogleman was flying an F-100 Super Sabre when the aircraft was shot down and he ejected 200 miles north of Bien Hoa. Fogleman became the only pilot to be rescued by holding on to an Army AH-1G's deployed gun-panel door. Bell built 1,116 AH-1Gs for the U.S. Army between 1967 and 1973, and the Cobras chalked up over a million operational hours in Vietnam; the number of Cobras in service peaked at 1,081. Out of nearly 1,110 AH-1s delivered from 1967 to 1973 approximately 300 were lost to combat and accidents during the war.


 

HH-1K Huey

first delivered in May 1970

27 HH-1K Huey aircraft were produced primarily as US Navy sea/air rescue helicopters.


Specifications
WINGSPAN:
LENGTH: 42 feet, 7 inches (Height: 14 feet, 7 inches)
MAXIMUM WEIGHT: 8,500 lbs Empty: 4,750 lbs Hook Load Limit: 5,000 lbs
PERFORMANCE: Lycoming T53-L-13 1,400-lb turbo-shaft engine
TOP SPEED: 138 mph
RANGE: 212 miles with maximum fuel
CEILING: 16,700 feet
RATE OF CLIMB:
ARMAMENT: Varied Among Helicopter Attach Light (HAL) "Seawolves" Units): Depending on need, mini-gun on pylon and/or single or dual M-60 machine gun mounts. Some operated air-cooled .50 caliber machine guns.
History

Vietnam:

The Sealords were flown in various missions in Vietnam: Logistics, SEAL inserts, SAR, medivac, and others as directed. The Sealords were actively involved with supporting the Seawolves, SEALS, and Riverine forces with their respective missions throughout the Mekong Delta.

 

HH-43 Huskie

introduced in 1957

Used throughout the 1950s to 1970s as a firefighting and rescue aircraft by the United States Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps.

Specifications
WINGSPAN:
LENGTH: 25 feet
MAXIMUM WEIGHT: 9,150 lbs
PERFORMANCE: Lycoming T53 turboshaft
TOP SPEED: 120 mph
RANGE: 185 miles
CEILING: 25,000 feet
RATE OF CLIMB:
ARMAMENT:
History

The Kaman HH-43 Huskie was a helicopter with intermeshing rotors used by the United States Air Force, the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps from the 1950s until the 1970s. It was primarily used for aircraft firefighting and rescue in the close vicinity of air bases, but was later used as a short range overland search and rescue aircraft during the Vietnam War.


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PT-17 Stearman

first flying in 1934

The Stearman (Boeing) Model 75 is a biplane, of which 10,346 were built in the United States during the 1930s and 1940s as a military trainer aircraft. Stearman became a subsidiary of Boeing in 1934. Widely known as the “Stearman”, “Boeing-Stearman” or “Kaydet”, it served as a Primary Trainer (PT) for the USAAF, as a basic trainer for the USN (as the NS1 & N2S), and with the RCAF as the “Kaydet” throughout World War II.


Specifications
WINGSPAN: 32 feet, 2 inches
LENGTH: 24 feet, 9 inches
MAXIMUM WEIGHT: 2,635 pounds
PERFORMANCE: 1 Continental R-670-5 seven-cylinder air-cooled radial 220 hp engine
TOP SPEED: 135 mph
RANGE: 505 miles
CEILING: 13,200 feet
RATE OF CLIMB: 840 feet per minute
ARMAMENT:
History

The Stearman (Boeing) Model 75 is a biplane, of which 10,346 were built in the United States during the 1930s and 1940s as a military trainer aircraft. Stearman became a subsidiary of Boeing in 1934. Widely known as the “Stearman”, “Boeing-Stearman” or “Kaydet”, it served as a Primary Trainer (PT) for the USAAF, as a basic trainer for the USN (as the NS1 & N2S), and with the RCAF as the “Kaydet” throughout World War II. After World War II, thousands of surplus aircraft were sold on the civil market. In the immediate post-war years they became popular as crop dusters and as sports planes.