Aircraft Collection

AIRCRAFT ON DISPLAY
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FG1D Corsair

first flying in 1942

The Olympic Flight Museum’s Corsair was built by Goodyear Aircraft Corporation in Akron, Ohio and was delivered to the US Navy on the 10th of July, 1945. Although too late to see combat action in WWII, she arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and was placed with the Marine Carrier Aircraft Service Unit 1 (MARCASU1) at Marine Corps Air Station Ewa (MCAS EWA).


Specifications
WINGSPAN: 40 feet, 11 inches
LENGTH: 33 feet; 4 inches
MAXIMUM WEIGHT: 12,039 lb
PERFORMANCE: Power Plant: Pratt-Whitney R-2800-8W, 2,250HP Engine
TOP SPEED: 425 mph
RANGE: 1,015 miles
CEILING: 37,000 feet
RATE OF CLIMB: 3,870 feet per minute
ARMAMENT: Six Browning M2 .50 Caliber Machine Guns; 2,000 lbs of bombs or rockets under the wings
History

The Corsair is one of the most recognizable airplanes ever built. First flying in 1942 and the final one rolling off the assembly line in 1953, over twelve thousand examples were built by three different companies. One of the most successful American fighter planes from WWII, they also saw heavy use in the Korean War. Their final combat action was in 1969 when a Honduran Air Force pilot shot down two Corsairs and a Mustang from the El Salvadoran Air Force during the “Soccer war”. This brought an end to the airplanes combat career and also marked the last ever aerial victories by propeller driven aircraft.

The Olympic Flight Museum’s Corsair was built by Goodyear Aircraft Corporation in Akron, Ohio and was delivered to the US Navy on the 10th of July, 1945. Although too late to see combat action in WWII, she arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and was placed with the Marine Carrier Aircraft Service Unit 1 (MARCASU1) at Marine Corps Air Station Ewa (MCAS EWA).

From there the Corsair was immediately assigned to Marine Fighting Squadron 213 (VMF-213). The Corsair stayed with VMF-213 until April 12, 1946 when she was shipped back to Naval Air Station San Diego for reconditioning and repair. In early 1947 she was assigned to the Naval Air Reserve Training Command at Squantum, Massachusetts. That started a chain of assignments to various Naval Reserve Squadrons all over the country, including Florida, Colorado, Texas, Michigan and right up the road at Seattle. Her final assignment was at NAS Dallas and was put in storage at Litchfield Park, Arizona in February of 1954.

On October 20, 1959 the Corsair was purchased from the storage yard by Alu-Met Smelters of Long Beach, California for $485.67. That same year she was purchased by Ed Maloney, founder of the Planes of Fame Air Museum in Chino, California for $650. In 1972 she was sold to the Desert Aviation Company in Las Vegas and finally ended up with the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum in Ontario in 1973. The Canadians flew the Corsair at airshows all over the US and Canada until 1998 when she was purchased by a private owner, brought back to the US and placed on loan to the Olympic Flight Museum.

By 2002 the years of use finally caught up with the Corsair. General wear and tear from a lifetime of use and various accidents and damage during her military years finally brought about the decision to restore the old girl to her former glory. She was sent to Airpower Unlimited in Jerome, Idaho to begin what would be an eleven and a half year restoration, encompassing over 38,000 hours of labor. This has been one of the most in-depth Corsair restorations completed so far.

When it came time to choose a paint scheme for the aircraft it was decided use one from the time that she was in the Military. The US Navy record cards only show one particular squadron of assignment by name, VMF-213. During the time period that this Corsair was assigned to that squadron in Hawaii, they were doing carrier operations off of the USS Saidor. Existing pictures of the squadron’s Corsairs at that time were used to come up with the paint scheme the airplane carries today. We know the airplane was in the squadron and at that location during the time frame and there is a high probability that she carried these markings.

The identification number “115” on the fuselage was chosen because it is the same number this Corsair carried when it was painted in Royal Navy colors during most of her life as an airshow performer. We wanted to pay homage to her warbird past if possible and also commemorate her military history. Less than thirty of these historic airplanes remain flying in the world today. The Olympic Flight Museum is proud to display the finest example of one of history’s greatest airplanes.

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P-51D Mustang

"american beauty"

The Mustang, designed initially to meet a British requirement for fighter service in Europe, became the leading US fighter in the European Theater of Operation during the final months of the war. The Mustang was designed and rolled out in 117 days.


Specifications
WINGSPAN: 37 feet
LENGTH: 32 feet; 2 inches
MAXIMUM WEIGHT: 11,600 lb
PERFORMANCE: Packard Merlin V-1650-7 12 Cyl, 1490HP Engine
TOP SPEED: 437 mph
RANGE: 950 miles without auxiliary fuel cells
CEILING: 41,900 feet
RATE OF CLIMB: 3,475 feet per minute
ARMAMENT: Six Browning M2 .50 Caliber Machine Guns
History

Produced: 15,551 (all variants)

Brief History:

  • 1951: RCAF 9300
  • 1958: N6313T
  • 1977: N51TK, “Lou IV” racer #19 (Tom Kelly)
  • 1986: N51KD, “Cutters Capers” race #91
  • 1993: (Wally Fisk)
  • 1999: Rep. new paint job “Slo-Mo-Shun” (Brian Reynolds)
  • 2000: New name: “American Beauty”

World War II History:

The Mustang, designed initially to meet a British requirement for fighter service in Europe, became the leading US fighter in the European Theater of Operation during the final months of the war. The Mustang was designed and rolled out in 117 days. It was first flown on October 26, 1940. The P-51is the synergism of every contemporary advanced aerodynamic and structural design; primarily, it was the first fighter with a laminar wing design. As a result, it held an exceptional internal fuel capacity and low drag enabling it to fly an extended combat radius.

The RAF first flew the P-51 on July 27, 1942 as the MK I Mustang, of which 620 were ordered. Although the aircraft had great potential, it was limited by its Allison engine and relegated primarily to ground attack and reconnaissance roles.

The USAAF ordered 500 Mustangs, the first buy as A-36A dive-bombers in late 1942. With an Allison powered V-1710-87 engine, the aircraft demonstrated high power at low level; however, it was inefficient above 15,000 feet with its single-stage supercharger. The aircraft wasn’t really wanted for an attack role, but was employed as a means to maintain the production line while the merits of the airframe were being argued. The A-36A was named the “Apache”, and then later the “Invader” until the name “Mustang” stuck. The aircrafts were moderately successful in the Mediterranean area of operation; claiming its share of aerial victories against the Luftwaffe in air-to-air combat.

Cautiously, the USAAF ordered an initial 150 P-51s mounted with four 20 mm cannons. Thereafter, 310 P-51As were ordered, with a 1,200 hp V-1710-81 engine, and four 0.5-in machine guns with racks for two 500-lb bombs.

The British took a dramatic step that began to turn off the cautious attitude toward the Mustang by proposing the Merlin engine be fitted into the air frame. There was even discussion that the engine should be placed behind the cockpit, similar to the P-39 configuration. In 1942, with installation of the two-stage Merlin engines and four-bladed propellers, the Mustang performed extremely well, exceeding 400 mph; and, the transformation produced a fighter that could equal or outperform any other aircraft in the air at that time. North American developed plans to manufacture the P-51 with the license-built Merlin 61, the Packard V-1650-3 in-line engine.

The USAAF ordered 2,200 P-51Bs followed on by the P-51Cs. The aircrafts were mounted with six 0.5 machine guns. The P-51D variant was ordered in 1943 and was introduced with the bubble canopy and dorsal fin to control stability problems. Even though the Malcom hood, which enhanced visibility on the British Mustang Mk II and Mk III, was employed by the USAAF, it was the bubble canopy that became the standard feature of the P-51. Few P-51Ds were operated by the British as the Mustang Mk V. Later P-51Ds included an additional 85-gal fuel cell behind the pilot’s seat. This enabled the Mustang’s combat radius to extend from England to Berlin and back.


P51D 44-13926, of the 361st FG, 8AF flown by
1st Lt. Urban Drew during WWII.

In an effort to lower the Mustang’s weight, the P-51H variant came about with a taller tail, of which 555 were manufactured. This version came late into the war and flew missions from the Philippines prior to VJ day.

The P-51K was the Dallas, Texas variant of the Inglewood, California
P-51D, sporting a different propeller, of which 1,500 were built. In combat, the Mustang proved to be significant in its role to wartime victory. The aircraft was employed throughout 40 USAAF fighter groups and 31 RAF squadrons. The P-51 Mustang’s combat record is generally considered to consist of: 4,950 aerial victories, and 4,131 ground kills resulting in an 11:1 “kill ratio”.

 

A6M2 “Tora” Zero

first flying in 1937

The A6M2 and it follow-on versions were considered one of the finest carrier fighter designs of WWII.


Specifications
WINGSPAN: 36 feet, 11-3/32 inches
LENGTH: 29 feet, 11 inches
MAXIMUM WEIGHT: 6,095 lb
PERFORMANCE: Mitsubishi NK1F Sake Engine, 980HP at 19,685 feet
TOP SPEED: 351 mph
RANGE: 1,171 miles at cruising speed of 230 mph
CEILING: 38,520 feet
RATE OF CLIMB: 2,526 feet per minute
ARMAMENT: Two Type 99 20mm cannons, one each wing; Two Type 97 machine guns in upper fuselage; Two 132-lb bombs, one under each wing
History

The A6M2 and it follow-on versions were considered one of the finest carrier fighter designs of WWII.

Pre-War War II:

In 1937, in light of combat reports from China, the Imperial Japanese Navy established specifications for a new carrier fighter aircraft. The aircraft had to achieve a maximum speed of 500 km/h at 4000 meters; a climb to 3000 meters in 3.5 minutes; an endurance a 1.5 to 2 hours at normal power and fully loaded and with additional fuel tank; or 6 to 8 hours at economical cruising speed; armament requirement consisted of two 20mm cannons and two 7.7 mm machine guns, and two 30 kg or 60 kg bombs; a complete radio set; a wing span of less than 12 meters; and maneuverability at least comparable to the A5M type 96 aircraft.

The specifications were presented to the Nakajima and Mitsubishi aircraft manufacturing teams. Nakajima considered the new requirements unrealistic and pulled out of the running. The Mitsubishi team, led by Jiro Horikoshi, presented a two-bladed propeller, low-winged monoplane with a retractable landing gear, and powered by a Mitsubishi Zuisei 13 engine. The aircraft presented a large canopy for an excellent view. The first prototype, the A6M1, was flown my Katsuzo Shima on April 1, 1939. The two-bladed propeller was soon replaced by a three-bladed propeller. On September 14, 1939, the Japanese Navy accepted the aircraft as the A6M1 Type 0 carrier fighter. After further testing the Mitsubishi Zuisei engine was replaced by the Nakajima Sakae engine and re-designated the A6M2. On July 31, 1940, the A6M2, named “Reisen”, entered into production as the Navy Type 0 carrier fighter, Model 11.

First Combat:

In August 1940, 15 pre-production A6M2s went to China. On September 13, 1940, 13 “Reisens”, led by Saburo Shindo attacked 27 Chinese I-15s and I-16s–all the Chinese aircraft were shot down without any Japanese losses.

World War II:

In November 1940, the aircraft was redesigned with manually folding wingtips so that the aircraft could fit on the deck elevators of Japanese aircraft carriers; it was designated as the Model 21. Production continued for two years in the Mitsubishi and Nakajima plants. A total of 1,540 aircrafts of this version were manufactured. The model 21 took part in the attacks on Pearl Harbor, the Battle of Midway, the Philippines, the Dutch East Indies, the New Guinea and the Solomon operations.

In October 1942, the Reisen (Zero) fought its last air campaign during the Battle of Santa Cruz. Thereafter, the A6M2 was replaced by the A6M3 and relegated to second line duties and training. The Reisen provided the basis for two other versions, the A6M2-N float plane, named the Rufe, and the A6M2-K two-seat trainer.

In the early years of the Pacific air war, the Reisen was a tight turning aircraft; it can turn on a dime. To gain its great maneuverability, it had to sacrifice amour protection for the pilot; thereby it was fragile and almost completely unprotected from enemy fire. An American fighter armed with .50 caliber machine guns is likely to tear the A6M2 in half and instantly kill the pilot if given a chance to fire from the rear. American pilots respected the Reisen by avoiding a dog fight. The outcome is the A6M2 would most likely out maneuver the American fighter. The American fighter pilot’s best approach was a rapid dive onto the rear of the A6M2.

A Japanese Ace, Saburo Saki:

Probably the most famous Japanese air war veteran of the Pacific, Saburo Sakai survived WWII with 64 confirmed aerial victories over US aircraft. His first actions, after Pearl Harbor, were in the Philippines and the Dutch East Indies. He shot down the first US bomber, a B-17E during the third day after the United States entered into WWII. He flew long-range missions from Rabaul to Guadalcanal before he moved to New Guinea, where he scored most of his 64 victories.

He was seriously wounded in 1943 during an attack on a formation of Dauntless dive bombers; whereby, he lost his right eye. The backseat gunner in a Dauntless creased his skull with a round. A year later, he was back flying and shot down four more aircraft. He saw action over Iwo Jima. His last engagement was on August 17, 1945; two days after Japan surrendered to the Allied forces.

In an act of chivalry, Sakai was ordered to shoot down any enemy aircraft during a bombing run of Java. Sakai encountered a civilian DC-4. He initially assumed important people were fleeing. He notices a woman and a child through the window, and decided not to shoot down the aircraft. He ordered the DC-4 pilot to continue on its course. Years later, he was interviewed by Dutch newspapermen regarding the event.

Above is a photo of Saburo Sakai. He became a historical advisor to the Microsoft, Inc., during the production of Combat Flight Simulator 2, died in Tokyo on September 22, 2000 at the age of 84.

 

L-39ZO Albatros

first flying in 1968

There are more than 2,800 L-39s belonging to more than 30 air forces world wide. The L-39 is very versatile from light attack missions to basic and advanced pilot training—it is the most widely used jet trainer in the world.

Specifications
WINGSPAN: 31 feet
LENGTH: 39 feet, 10 inches
MAXIMUM WEIGHT: 12,560 lb
PERFORMANCE: 1 Progressive/Ivchenko AI-25TL turbofan engine
TOP SPEED: 470 mph at 16,000 feet
RANGE: 620 miles
CEILING: 37,730 feet
RATE OF CLIMB: 4,130 feet per minute
ARMAMENT: Up to 2,840 pounds of stores on four external hardpoints including: AAMs (K-13) missiles, 7.62mm machine-gun pods, free-fall cluster bombs, rocket launchers and drop tanks
History

The Aero L-39 Albatros is a high performance, jet trainer aircraft. It was developed in Czechoslovakia to replace the L-29 Delfin. The L-39 was the very first turbofan-powered trainer. The trainer is stilled produced as the more advanced L-159 Alca. There are more than 2,800 L-39s belonging to more than 30 air forces world wide. The L-39 is very versatile from light attack missions to basic and advanced pilot training—it is the most widely used jet trainer in the world.

 

UH-1H Huey

first arrived in 1963

The utility of the Bell UH-1 series Iroquois, widely renowned as the "Huey," solidified air mobility as the primary means to insert infantry into combat environments. The Huey began arriving in South Vietnam in 1963.


Specifications
WINGSPAN:
LENGTH: 57 feet, 3 inches (Height: 14 feet, 9 inches)
MAXIMUM WEIGHT: 9,500 lbs Empty: 5.210 lbs
PERFORMANCE: 1,400 Hp, Lycoming T53-L-13
TOP SPEED: 127 mph
RANGE: 276 nautical miles
CEILING: 12,600 feet
RATE OF CLIMB:
ARMAMENT: Typically, M60 machine guns manned by door gunners.
History

Vietnam:

The utility of the Bell UH-1 series Iroquois, widely renowned as the "Huey," solidified air mobility as the primary means to insert infantry into combat environments. The Huey began arriving in South Vietnam in 1963. The UH-1H is a late variant of the Huey, the most common utility helicopter used in Vietnam. To save weight, the Slick was fitted typically with M60 machine guns used by door gunners. By the time the conflict ended, more than 5000 Hueys were introduced throughout SE Asia. The Huey was a versatile aircraft and was employed in many aspects of operation. They were used as air assault vehicles, command and control, medical evacuation, gun ships, counter-insurgency, and transport.

OTHER AIRCRAFT IN COLLECTION
cayuse_thumb
 

OH-6A Cayuse

first flying in 1937

Formerly the Hughes model 369, the OH-6A Cayuse (nicknamed "Loach") was designed for use as a military scout during the Vietnam conflict to meet the U.S. Army's need for an extremely maneuverable light observation helicopter.


Specifications
WINGSPAN: Rotor Diameter: 26 ft. 4''
LENGTH: 23 feet
MAXIMUM WEIGHT: 8,404 lb Payload: 2,700 lb
PERFORMANCE: Allison T-63-A-5A turbo shaft
TOP SPEED: 147 mph maximum
RANGE: 413 miles
CEILING: ---
RATE OF CLIMB: ---
ARMAMENT: Can be armed with the M26 armament subsystem mounting a M134 7.62 mini-gun or 40 mm grenade launcher on the XM8 armament subsystem. An M60D 7.62 mm machine gun could be mounted in the right door opening.
History

Formerly the Hughes model 369, the OH-6A Cayuse (nicknamed "Loach") was designed for use as a military scout during the Vietnam conflict to meet the U.S. Army's need for an extremely maneuverable light observation helicopter. Initially fielded in Vietnam in early 1968, the Cayuse was employed in command and control; observation and reconnaissance; and target acquisition. The four-passenger teardrop shaped was a small, light, sturdy, highly, maneuverable helicopter, with very low drag.

The Cayuse was teamed often with the AH-1G "Cobra" attack helicopter in acquiring and attacking enemy targets. The Cayuse would "troll for fire" across suspected enemy positions; place smoke on the target; and allow the Cobra to attack the positions. The Cayuse could absorb an extensive amount of enemy small arms fire; yet still bring the crew home.

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AH-1S COBRA

introduced in 1967

The Bell AH-1 Cobra is a two-blade, single-engine attack helicopter manufactured by Bell Helicopter, developed using the engine, transmission and rotor system of the Bell UH-1 Iroquois.

Specifications
WINGSPAN:
LENGTH: 53 feet
MAXIMUM WEIGHT: 8,404 lb (Payload: 2,500 lb)
PERFORMANCE: Lycoming T53-L-11 1100 hp engine
TOP SPEED: 138 mph
RANGE: 359 miles
CEILING:
RATE OF CLIMB:
ARMAMENT: Varies depending on model. For AH-1G "Snake": 2.75-inch (70mm) Folding Fin Aerial Rockets in M158 7-tube or M200 19- tube rocket launcher; chin-turret mounted M134 7.62 mm "mini-gun" and the m129 40mm grenade launcher. AH1-G could be mounted with the M134 "mini-gun" in fixed-mounted M18/M18A1 gun pod and left-side mounted M195 20 mm automatic gun on M35 armament subsystem. The AH-1G could also mount the XM118 smoke grenade launcher.
History

AH-1 Cobras were in use by the Army during the Tet offensive in 1968 and through to the end of the Vietnam War. Cobras provided fire support for ground forces, escorted transport helicopters and other roles, including aerial rocket artillery (ARA) battalions in the two Airmobile divisions. They also formed "hunter killer" teams by pairing with OH-6A scout helicopters. A team featured one OH-6 flying slow and low to find enemy forces. If the OH-6 drew fire, the Cobra could strike at the then revealed enemy. On 12 September 1968, Capt. Ronald Fogleman was flying an F-100 Super Sabre when the aircraft was shot down and he ejected 200 miles north of Bien Hoa. Fogleman became the only pilot to be rescued by holding on to an Army AH-1G's deployed gun-panel door. Bell built 1,116 AH-1Gs for the U.S. Army between 1967 and 1973, and the Cobras chalked up over a million operational hours in Vietnam; the number of Cobras in service peaked at 1,081. Out of nearly 1,110 AH-1s delivered from 1967 to 1973 approximately 300 were lost to combat and accidents during the war.


hh-1k_thumb
 

HH-1K Huey

first delivered in May 1970

27 HH-1K Huey aircraft were produced primarily as US Navy sea/air rescue helicopters.


Specifications
WINGSPAN:
LENGTH: 42 feet, 7 inches (Height: 14 feet, 7 inches)
MAXIMUM WEIGHT: 8,500 lbs Empty: 4,750 lbs Hook Load Limit: 5,000 lbs
PERFORMANCE: Lycoming T53-L-13 1,400-lb turbo-shaft engine
TOP SPEED: 138 mph
RANGE: 212 miles with maximum fuel
CEILING: 16,700 feet
RATE OF CLIMB:
ARMAMENT: Varied Among Helicopter Attach Light (HAL) "Seawolves" Units): Depending on need, mini-gun on pylon and/or single or dual M-60 machine gun mounts. Some operated air-cooled .50 caliber machine guns.
History

Vietnam:

The Sealords were flown in various missions in Vietnam: Logistics, SEAL inserts, SAR, medivac, and others as directed. The Sealords were actively involved with supporting the Seawolves, SEALS, and Riverine forces with their respective missions throughout the Mekong Delta.

huskie
 

HH-43 Huskie

introduced in 1967

Used throughout the 1950s to 1970s as a firefighting and rescue aircraft by the United States Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps.

Specifications
WINGSPAN:
LENGTH: 25 feet
MAXIMUM WEIGHT: 9,150 lbs
PERFORMANCE: Lycoming T53 turboshaft
TOP SPEED: 120 mph
RANGE: 185 miles
CEILING: 25,000 feet
RATE OF CLIMB:
ARMAMENT:
History

The Kaman HH-43 Huskie was a helicopter with intermeshing rotors used by the United States Air Force, the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps from the 1950s until the 1970s. It was primarily used for aircraft firefighting and rescue in the close vicinity of air bases, but was later used as a short range overland search and rescue aircraft during the Vietnam War.


 

PT-17 Stearman

first flying in 1934

The Stearman (Boeing) Model 75 is a biplane, of which 10,346 were built in the United States during the 1930s and 1940s as a military trainer aircraft. Stearman became a subsidiary of Boeing in 1934. Widely known as the “Stearman”, “Boeing-Stearman” or “Kaydet”, it served as a Primary Trainer (PT) for the USAAF, as a basic trainer for the USN (as the NS1 & N2S), and with the RCAF as the “Kaydet” throughout World War II.


Specifications
WINGSPAN: 32 feet, 2 inches
LENGTH: 24 feet, 9 inches
MAXIMUM WEIGHT: 2,635 pounds
PERFORMANCE: 1 Continental R-670-5 seven-cylinder air-cooled radial 220 hp engine
TOP SPEED: 135 mph
RANGE: 505 miles
CEILING: 13,200 feet
RATE OF CLIMB: 840 feet per minute
ARMAMENT:
History

The Stearman (Boeing) Model 75 is a biplane, of which 10,346 were built in the United States during the 1930s and 1940s as a military trainer aircraft. Stearman became a subsidiary of Boeing in 1934. Widely known as the “Stearman”, “Boeing-Stearman” or “Kaydet”, it served as a Primary Trainer (PT) for the USAAF, as a basic trainer for the USN (as the NS1 & N2S), and with the RCAF as the “Kaydet” throughout World War II. After World War II, thousands of surplus aircraft were sold on the civil market. In the immediate post-war years they became popular as crop dusters and as sports planes.

 

Aero L-29 Delfín

first flying in April 1959 - COMING SOON

Throughout its program, over 3,000 L-29 Delfin trainers were produced. Of these, around 2,000 were reported to have been delivered to Russia, where it was used as the standard trainer for the Soviet Air Force.


Specifications
WINGSPAN: ---
LENGTH: 35 feet
MAXIMUM WEIGHT: 5,027 lb
PERFORMANCE: Motorlet M-701C 500 turboje
TOP SPEED: 510 mph
RANGE: 556 miles
CEILING: ---
RATE OF CLIMB: ---
ARMAMENT: ---
History

The Aero L-29 Delfín (Dolphin) is a military jet trainer developed and manufactured by Czechoslovakian aviation manufacturer Aero Vodochody. It is the country's first locally designed and constructed jet aircraft, as well as likely being the biggest aircraft industrial program to take place in its region outside of the Soviet Union.